Tag: Jesus

The Law of the sword

(New World)    By Chuck Baldwin My last two columns which stated that my line in the sand has been drawn and I will NOT register or surrender my firearms, even if that makes me a lawbreaker (in the sight of…

Quake reveals day of Jesus’ crucifixion, researchers believe

They say analysis of Dead Sea seismic activity points to Friday, April 3, in year 33

An 1849 Currier & Ives lithograph shows the tumult surrounding Jesus’ crucifixion. Geologists say the historical event may have taken place April 3 in the year 33, based on an analysis of seismic records.

By Jennifer Viegas

Geologists say Jesus, as described in the New Testament, was most likely crucified on Friday, April 3, in the year 33.

The latest investigation, reported in International Geology Review, focused on earthquake activity at the Dead Sea, located 13 miles from Jerusalem. The Gospel of Matthew, Chapter 27, mentions that an earthquake coincided with the crucifixion:

“And when Jesus had cried out again in a loud voice, he gave up his spirit. At that moment the curtain of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom. The earth shook, the rocks split and the tombs broke open.”

Vanderbilt says Christian club can’t require leaders to be devout Christians

By Todd Starnes

Vanderbilt University has informed a small Christian student organization that it will no longer be recognized as a student group because it requires its members to have a personal commitment to Jesus Christ, according to email correspondence provided to Fox News.

“It just shows how radical the Vanderbilt administration has become in enforcing a policy that is nonsense,” said Kim Colby, senior counsel for the Christian Legal Society’s Center for Law and Religious Freedom. “A lot of jaws dropped when we saw how far the Vanderbilt administration was taking this.”

Colby told Fox News the Christian group did not want to be identified because “they just don’t want to be caught in the crossfire of the culture wars.”

The group reached out to the Vandy chapter of the Christian Legal Society so others would know what had happened, Colby said.

“They are a small group of students who want to gather together and worship God,” she said. “That’s basically all they want to do.”

Pope highlights Mary’s role as ‘woman of the apocalypse’

Benjamin Mann Pope Benedict XVI reflected on the biblical description of a “woman clothed with the sun” in his remarks at Rome’s Spanish Steps on the 2011 Feast of the Immaculate Conception.

“What is the meaning of this image? It represents the Church and Our Lady at the same time,” the Pope told the crowd assembled before the nearby statue commemorating the 1854 definition of Mary’s Immaculate Conception. “Before all, the ‘woman’ of the apocalypse is Mary herself.”

The 12th chapter of the Biblical Apocalypse – also known as the Book of Revelation – describes the glorification and persecution of “a woman clothed with the sun, with the moon under her feet, and on her head a crown of twelve stars.”

Though not named, this woman is described as the mother of the Messiah. In poetic language akin to the Bible’s other prophetic books, Saint John says she faced the threat of “a huge red dragon, with seven heads and ten horns,” and “fled into the desert where she had a place prepared by God.”

The Sun and the crescent

Christians seeking to introduce others to the Savior must walk a fine line. They must connect with their audience but not distort scriptural essentials of the gospel. This is especially challenging when reaching out to Muslims, who are frequently indoctrinated with erroneous ideas about who Jesus is. For example, when many Muslims hear the biblical title “Son of God,” they believe this means that Christians think God had sexual relations with Mary.

Missionaries and Christian scholars disagree over whether a particular approach to the “Son of God” title will overcome this inaccurate perception and win a hearing for the gospel. (See the Christianity Today article “The Son and the Crescent,” by Collin Hansen.) The approach, used by growing numbers of missionaries working in various Muslim areas, dispenses with that particular title, replacing it with a formulation such as “Beloved Son who comes or originates from God.” They are seeing some impressive results, but sympathetic critics say they risk losing deeper meanings and nuances about our faith that God wants us to have. Who’s right? Is the sensitive term “Son of God” really all that essential? And, if it is, how should we best use it?

Jesus was a Palestinian

“no one denies that,” says PA TV
by Itamar Marcus and Nan Jacques Zilberdik

One of the ways the Palestinian Authority attempts to create a Palestinian history is to deny the Judean/Jewish nationality of Jesus, and misrepresent him as a “Palestinian.”

Palestinian Media Watch has documented this ongoing Palestinian Authority historical revision. Recently on PA TV, the author Samih Ghanadreh from Nazareth was interviewed about his book “Christianity and Its Connection to Islam.”

The following is the transcript of the discussion describing Jesus as a Palestinian:

Religious program on PA TV: This is our religion
Author: “The Shahid (Martyr) President Yasser Arafat used to say: “Jesus was the first Palestinian Shahid (Martyr).” I heard him say that sentence many times.”
PA TV Host: “He [Jesus] was a Palestinian; no one denies that.”
Author: “He [Jesus] was the first Palestinian Shahid (Martyr). He (Arafat) attributed this Martyrdom to Palestine, as well.”

Christian communities in the Holy Land are declining

In the land where Jesus lived, Christians say their dwindling numbers are turning churches from places of worship into museums. And when Christian pilgrims come from all over the world to visit the places of Christ’s birth, death and resurrection, they find them divided by a concrete wall.

Members of the Abu al-Zulaf family, Palestinian Christians, have left the hills and olive groves of their village near Bethlehem for Sweden and the United States, seeking a better life than that on offer in the Israeli-occupied West Bank.

Ayman Abu al-Zulaf, 41, moved to France in 1998. But he returned to Beit Sahour, the village where he was born, a year later. “I needed to be here, not in France,” he said. “Without Christians, the Holy Land, the land of Jesus, has no value.”