Tag: Christians

The new Christian settlers

Yair Altman

Will US Christians settle in Samaria? About 1,000 Americans have signed a document requesting to convert to Judaism, move to Israel, and settle in Samaria.

The group members are seeking to serve in the IDF and later establish communities based on the Kibbutz movement model.

The document was presented to Yisrael Beiteinu Knesset Member Lia Shemtov, who met with the group’s representative last week and promised to offer her help in facilitating the initiative.

The Christian group’s representative, Baruch Abramovich, said he was hopeful that MK Shemtov would be able to elicit the government’s support for the initiative.

Ironically, the venture received a boost through the help of priests at some 70 different churches in the US, who last summer urged their followers to boycott Abramovich and his new community. The broad media coverage attracted many new participants to the initiative.

Obama silent while Muslims rape and burn Christians alive

Radical Muslims in Africa’s Ivory Coast are perpetrating a massacre on Christians while the Obama administration stands by and does nothing, Jerome Corsi’s Red Alert reports.

Now, Ivory Coast President-elect Alassane Ouattara’s largely Muslim forces have kept Christian Laurent Gbagbo, the current president, in his Abidjan residence under siege.

In retaliation, Gbagbo forces launched two mortars and a rocket at the residence of the French ambassador and French helicopter gunships responded by attacking Gbagbo forces.

Shas leader denies funds for fire trucks donated by Christians

Israeli firefighters could have received a shipment of brand new fire trucks that would have helped quell the fires that raged over the weekend on Mount Carmel, killing 41 people and turning tens of thousands of dunams into an ashen wasteland.

Instead, a charity group charged Sunday, Interior Minister Eli Yishai refused to accept donations from pro- Israel Christians and thus denied the underfunded Fire and Rescue Service much-needed equipment.

Rabbi Yechiel Eckstein, founder of the International Fellowship of Christians and Jews, which raises money for Israel among Christian supporters in North America, said his organization’s ties with the Interior Ministry were severed after it was taken over by the ultra-Orthodox minister two years ago.

Christians rounded up in Iran crackdown

By Brian Murphy-Iran rounds up Christians in crackdown

Iran has arrested about 70 Christians since Christmas in a crackdown that demonstrates the limits of religious tolerance by Islamic leaders who often boast they provide room for other faiths.

The latest raids have targeted grass-roots Christian groups Iran describes as “hard-liners” who pose a threat to the Islamic state. Authorities increasingly view them with suspicions that range from trying to convert Muslims to being possible footholds for foreign influence.

Christian activists claim their Iranian brethren are being persecuted simply for worshipping outside officially sanctioned mainstream churches

Cross banished from souvenirs in Bethlehem

Rick Moran
When even wearing the cross can get you into trouble with the you know who’s:

This Christmas in Bethlehem, the cross has been banned from souvenirs for tourists and pilgrims in the Holy Land. Some textile workshops in Jerusalem and Hebron have begun to print and sell T-shirts depicting the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem without the cross. Because of the growth of Islamic fundamentalism in the Palestinian territories, the cross was also removed from t-shirts of football teams. Interviewed by AsiaNews, Samir Qumsieh, journalist and director of the Catholic television station Al-Mahed Nativity TV in Bethlehem, said: “I want to launch a campaign to urge people not to buy these products – he says – because the removal of the cross is an intimidation against Christians, it is like saying that Jesus was never crucified. ”

Like every year, thousands including authorities, faithful and tourists from all over the world crowd, the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem for midnight mass on the night of 24 December. It will be celebrated by the Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem and will be attended by the highest offices of the Palestinian Authority.

Christians dwindle in Bethlehem, and hope it will get better

Linda Gradstein

BETHLEHEM, West Bank — Adel and Sahar Handel have decorated their Christmas tree and tucked a traditional crèche underneath it.

They have replaced their everyday tablecloths with special Christmas ones, and Sahar serves visitors special Christmas butter cookies.

And yet, they say, their position as Christians and as Palestinians is increasingly difficult in this town where Christianity began.

“Jesus was born here, and we pray in the most beautiful church in the world,” Sahar said. “But the situation is just not good. I really hope things will get better because I really want to stay here.”

Read Entire Story in AOL

Christians the problem, not Mormons

I concur wholeheartedly with this statement by Dr. Jim Garlow in his post on his church website giving his views on this issue as he asserts, “If this nation collapses in the 2010-2012 time frame, historians will have to report, if they are honest, that American fell because of silent pastors and inactive pews.”

The furor over Glenn Beck’s Mormon faith and his defense by some evangelical leaders, following closely on the heels of President Obama being called a “devout Christian,” does raise critical questions. How far can we ally ourselves with those who believe differently toward common goals without compromising our convictions? Does it matter what we believe?

We can and must stand together with Mormons on a cultural/political level as we have in particular on sanctity of life and defense of marriage issues. I pray that one day the evangelical churches will exhibit one half as much commitment of manpower and money to those causes. However, we are not just different denominations.

Now Christians set to attack tea partiers

Author warns of next assault after failed attempt to define group as racist

With recent attempts to portray tea-party members as racist backfiring, a renewed attack is being launched, warns the author of “The Tea Party Manifesto,” and this one is from progressive Christians who claim the movement lacks Christ-like charity.

Just as the racism accusation from the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People proved groundless before it deteriorated into an embarrassing public-relations disaster that encompassed the White House, says Joseph Farah, author of the “Manifesto,” no one should accept the latest salvo as gospel either.

‘Allahu akbar!’ shouted as Christians cuffed

Witness: ‘I never thought I would see this in America’

Four Christians were arrested and thrown out of a public Arab festival in Michigan – and at least two people claim a crowd cheered “Allahu akbar!” while the Christians were led away in handcuffs for doing nothing more than engaging in peaceful dialogue and videotaping the event.

Nabeel Qureshi, David Wood, Paul Rezkalla and 18-year-old Negeen Mayel attended the 15th annual Dearborn Arab International Festival on June 18 in Dearborn, Mich., where an estimated 30,000 of the city’s 98,000 residents are Muslim.

The American Arab Chamber of Commerce announced the event was expected to draw “over 300,000 people from across the country, Canada and the Middle East.” The festival covers 14 blocks and is free and open to the public.

Qureshi and Mayel are former Muslims who are now Christians. Mayel’s parents emigrated from Afghanistan. Wood is a former atheist. All are from a Christian group called Acts 17 Apologetics.

In the following video after the arrest, Qureshi said his group took “extra precautions” to prevent disruptions by not handing out pamphlets and to speak only to people “who first approached us”:

Two became twenty

It was a quiet Friday, one in which I wanted to study and prepare for the coming Shabbat, when my phone rang. Renee said, “Did you get the flyer? The one about the CAIR anti-Israel rally this afternoon at 4:30? I thought you might want to do something about it.”

“No, I didn’t get the flyer. What’s happening.” And that began the end of a quiet afternoon.

CAIR – Council on American-Islamic Relations – was sponsoring a rally from 4:30 to 6:00 to “to decry Israel’s attack on humanitarian aid ship share.” Probably the last thing in the world I wanted to do on this very hot June afternoon was to stand on a street corner and protest the protestors. I thought about it for a moment. Could I, in all honesty and integrity, sit back in my comfortable, air conditioned home and do nothing? And what about my ten-year-old granddaughter who was with me until her parents got off work. Should I take her to a rally like this that could conceivably turn dangerous?