Tag: Arizona

Arizona could soon approve gold, silver as legal tender

After being rejected by three state legislatures this year, a measure to recognize U.S. Government-minted gold and silver coins as legal tender may find a second home in Arizona.
Author: Dorothy Kosich

Arizona could soon become the second U.S. state to recognize gold and silver as legal tender if the Arizona House approves SB 1439.

The bill has already won the approval of Arizona’s State Senate and the Arizona House Financial Institutions Committee which voted the legislation out of committee on a 4-2 vote Monday. The measure now goes to a vote of the Arizona House.

Thus far, only the State of Utah has officially recognized gold and silver as legal tender, (See: Gold, silver coins now officially legal tender in Utah) although the issue has been under consideration this year in four states including Arizona. The Arizona bill defines legal tender as a mode of paying debts and taxes.

Arizona, federal government, immigration law, Pinal County

“What’s very troubling is the fact that at a time when we in law enforcement and our state need help from the federal government, instead of sending help they put up billboard-size signs warning our citizens to stay out of the desert in my county because of dangerous drug and human smuggling and weapons and bandits and all these other things and then, behind that, they drag us into court with the ACLU,”
Pinal County (Ariz.) Sheriff Paul Babeu(Correction: As initially posted, this story inaccurately said that Pinal County was contiguous with the Mexican border. It is in southern Arizona, but not on the border.)

Pinal County (Ariz.) Sheriff Paul Babeu is hopping mad at the federal government.

Babeu told CNSNews.com that rather than help law enforcement in Arizona stop the hundreds of thousands of people who come into the United States illegally, the federal government is targeting the state and its law enforcement personnel.

“What’s very troubling is the fact that at a time when we in law enforcement and our state need help from the federal government, instead of sending help they put up billboard-size signs warning our citizens to stay out of the desert in my county because of dangerous drug and human smuggling and weapons and bandits and all these other things and then, behind that, they drag us into court with the ACLU,” Babeu said.

Timing of national guard’s deployment to southwest Border Stirs Confusion, Anger

A US National Guard vehicle guards covered under camouflage fabric sits atop a mountain next to the border fence near Sonoyta, Mexico, Thursday, July 29, 2010. (AP)

The 1,200 National Guard troops expected to arrive Sunday on the southwest border for reinforcement won’t finish deploying until late September, federal officials say, stirring confusion and anger among Arizona lawmakers who thought the deadline was Aug. 1.

President Obama announced in May he would send National Guard troops amid growing concerns about border violence stemming from illegal immigration and drug smuggling. Many called for a military presence along the U.S-Mexico border to assist border patrol agents as Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer signed a controversial law making illegal immigration a state crime — a policy that a judge weakened this week in federal court.

Earlier this month, the Department of Homeland Security said the troops would be sent Aug. 1. But now both the National Guard Bureau and the Customs Border Protection says that date was when they were directed to start ramping up their numbers.

The fight is far from over

Obama won. The people lost. That’s the real story of the decision of Judge Susan Bolton to issue a preliminary injunction against major portions of the Arizona law to protect the state against illegal immigrants.

The law, to take effect July 29, had the support, not only of the majority in Arizona, but also in the country at large. A Pew Research Center poll found 59 percent of residents in favor. Arizonans have seen the equivalent of a foreign invasion of their state from Mexico, practically bankrupting the state in costs ranging from law enforcement to public services for immigrants.

The law, SB 1070, was misconstrued and mischaracterized from the start. U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder admitted in a Congressional hearing that he had not even read the bill, even after the Obama Administration had decided that it should be overturned.

17 more states planning Ariz. ‘illegal’ crackdown

“Our national network of activists have been working overtime trying to help the state of Arizona and the brave Arizonans who have passed this bill,” he said. “Arizona no longer stands alone and we have now documented state lawmakers filing, or announcing they will file, versions of the Arizona bill in seventeen states! We will not stop until all states are protected from invasion as required by the U.S. Constitution.”
But ICE chief says feds might not ‘process’ illegals arrested by state

In what is developing into a standoff between states and the federal government that could be bigger than gun control or even health care, 17 states have launched versions of Arizona’s immigration law, even as federal officials say they may not bother to process illegal aliens caught by the states.

William Gheen, president of Americans for Legal Immigration PAC, which has been trying to get officials to address the open southern border for years, warned the consequences could be dire.

“Over the last couple days, Obama and the chief of ICE have refused to honor their oaths of office,” he said. “Their constitutional requirement is to enforce existing laws.

“They’ve told the American public to go eat cake,” he said.

Tell Washington what you think about immigration by sending every member of the Senate “The No Amnesty Pledge.”

His organization is assembling the list of state efforts to emulate the Arizona law, which makes it illegal under state as well as federal law to be in the state without documentation.

“Seventeen states are now filing versions of Arizona’s SB 1070, which is designed to help local police enforce America’s existing immigration laws,” ALIPAC said in a report today.

Arizona has it right

In the absence of any real border enforcement by the federal government, Arizona rightfully took matters into their own hands and passed a law that whereby Arizona cops can demand to see immigration papers from people they stop.

Good for Arizona. Other states, especially border states, should follow their lead.