Princeton players are divided by heritage, united by basketball

When asked about their political views, cultures and backgrounds and whether they create problems for them on or off the basketball court, Niveen Rasheed and Lauren Polansky laugh simultaneously.

The Palestinian-American shooting guard and the Jewish point guard, freshman teammates on the Princeton women’s basketball team, understand why people bring up the subject, but to them it is not an issue. What they really care about, they say, are winning games and fostering a friendship that trumps whatever religious or ethnic differences may exist.

Rasheed’s parents are Palestinians, born and raised in the West Bank, and one of her sisters is part of the Palestinian diplomatic corps at the United Nations.

Read Entire Story in New York Times

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Princeton Players Are Divided by Heritage, United by Basketball

When asked about their political views, cultures and backgrounds and whether they create problems for them on or off the basketball court, Niveen Rasheed and Lauren Polansky laugh simultaneously.

The Palestinian-American shooting guard and the Jewish point guard, freshman teammates on the Princeton women’s basketball team, understand why people bring up the subject, but to them it is not an issue. What they really care about, they say, are winning games and fostering a friendship that trumps whatever religious or ethnic differences may exist.

Rasheed’s parents are Palestinians, born and raised in the West Bank, and one of her sisters is part of the Palestinian diplomatic corps at the United Nations.

Read Entire Story in New York Times http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/08/sports/ncaabasketball/08princeton.html?emc=eta1

ball team

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *