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Posts Tagged ‘ Torah ’

Parshas Vayeitzeh: The mystery of The Ten Lost Tribes

Parshas Vayeitzeh: The mystery of The Ten Lost Tribes

By: Rabbi Boruch Leff It’s a question that has bothered me for years and I have never found a satisfactory answer. What in the world happened to the Ten Lost Tribes? How could we lose ten out of twelve tribes, 83% of our peoplehood? The Torah emphasizes that we, Klal Yisrael, are comprised of twelve unique groups, each one being a vital component to our identity as a nation. The blessings by Yaakov Avinu in Parshas Vayechi, the blessings by Moshe Rabbeinu in Parshas VeZos HaBeracha, the twelve unique and individual stones which appeared on the breastplate of the Kohen…

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Shabbat Shalom -Parsha

Shabbat Shalom -Parsha

Shabbat Shalom Torah: V'et'chanan ("And U pleaded") Duet. 3:23-7:11 Haftarah Isa. 40:1-26 Candle Lighting Times Read Entire Story in Battalion of Deborah

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Shabbat Shalom – Parsha

Shabbat Shalom – Parsha

Shabbat Shalom Balak ("Balak") Num.22:2-25:9 Hatarah Micah 5:6-6:8 Candle Lighting Times Read Entire Story in Battalion of Deborah

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Shabbat Shalom-weekly Parsha

Shabbat Shalom-weekly Parsha

Shabbat Shalom Korach ("Korah") Num. 16:1-18:32 Haftara 1 Sam. 11:14-12:22

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Shabbat Shalom-Weekly Parsha

Shabbat Shalom-Weekly Parsha

Shabbat Shalom Eve of Shavuot B'mindbar ("In the wilderness") Num. 1:1-4:20 Haftarah Hos. 2:1-22(3:24) Shavuot Exo. 19:1-26 Num. 28:26-31 Hatarah Eze/1:1-28, 3:12 Candle Lighting Times Read Entire Story in Battalion of Deborah

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Unity at Sinai

Unity at Sinai

by Rabbi Noah Weinberg When the Jewish people stood at Mount Sinai, the entire nation was unified. The lesson is clear for us today. Throughout the Torah, the Jewish people are always referred to in the plural form. This is evident in Exodus 19:2, which says the Jews "journeyed (vayi'su)... arrived (vaya'vo'u)... encamped (vaya'chanu)" -- all references are in the plural. But then this verse ends with a surprise: Vayichan sham Yisrael neged ha'har -- "and the Jews encamped (singular) opposite the mountain." In coming to Sinai, the Jewish people are referred to in the singular form. Rashi says this…

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The Commandment of Counting

The Commandment of Counting

by Rebbetzin Tziporah Heller Counting the Omer teaches us mindfulness, and opens our hearts to the power of stories. The commandment to count the omer is one of the more curious prescriptions of the Torah. We are told to count the 49 days between Passover and Shavuot even though, of course, the number of days never changes. Therefore, it is very much an effort in which the process is in and of itself a value. The word for "number" in Hebrew is mispar. Its root is closely related to the word for "story" ― sipur. What is the relationship between…

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Understanding Lag B’Omer

Understanding Lag B’Omer

by Yair Danielsohn What lies behind this enigmatic festival? And why the bonfires? In Israel, months before the advent of the festival of Lag B’Omer -- the 33rd day of the Omer, the 49 days that bridge between Passover and Shavuot -- one can see youngsters dragging all types of combustibles, from fallen trees to broken chairs to old mattresses. Their destination? The nearest empty lot, where they pile their treasured possessions to impossible heights and wait with eager anticipation until the night of Lag B'Omer, arguably their favorite time of year, when they turn the piles into enormous conflagrations.…

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Make the counting count

Make the counting count

Instead of counting down toward the big day, with the Omer we count up The Jewish people left Egypt on Passover, and 50 days later (on the holiday of Shavuot) received the Torah at Mount Sinai. Today, in revisiting that Sinai experience, we observe a special mitzvah called "Counting the Omer," where we actually count aloud each of these days, beginning on the second night of Passover. (The Omer was a special offering brought to the Holy Temple during this season.) Counting in anticipation of an exciting event is quite understandable. At one time or another, we've all probably said…

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Massacre in Toulouse

Massacre in Toulouse

A Call From the Heart by Mrs. Eva Sandle My heart is broken. I am unable to speak. There are no ways for me to be able to express the great and all-consuming pain resulting from the murder of my dear husband Rabbi Jonathan and our sons, Aryeh and Gavriel, and of Miriam Monsonego, daughter of the dedicated principal of Ozar Hatorah and his wife, Rabbi Yaakov and Mrs. Monsonego. May no one ever have to endure such pain and suffering. The spirit of the Jewish people can never be extinguished Because so many of you, my cherished brothers and…

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